Cooking 🇵🇭 Chicken Adobo Recipe – Filipino Tagalog Pinoy

🇵🇭 Chicken Adobo Recipe – Filipino Tagalog Pinoy

CHICKEN,POTATO,ONIONS,GARLIC,SOY SAUCE,VINEGAR,OYSTER SAUCE,BAYLEAVES,
GROUND BLACK PEPPERS,WATER.

METHOD..

01.IN A LARGE COOKING POT SIMPLY ADD THE CHICKEN AND ALL THE INGREDIENTS.
02.ADD SOME WATER AND MAKE SURE THAT THE WATER LEVEL IS COVERED ALL THE INGREDIENTS
03.BRING IT TO A BOIL FOR ABOUT 30 TO 35 MINUTES
04.ONCE THE LIQUID IS EVAPORATE AND THE CHICKEN IS TENDER MEANING IT IS READY TO SERVED.
Once again we are back with Chef Jun. Juns recipes are in Tagalog the official language of the Philippines. Please check below here for a list of the ingredients for this recipe in English. There is also a list guide of names and terms to help you with your Pinoy Filipino cooking.

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Adobo/Inadobo − cooked in vinegar, oil, garlic and soy sauce.
Babad/Binabad/Ibinabad − to marinate.
Banli/Binanlian/Pabanli − blanched.
Bagoong/Binagoongan/ – sa Bagoong” − cooked with fermented fish paste bagoong.
Binalot – literally “wrapped.” This generally refers to dishes wrapped in banana leaves, pandan leaves, or even aluminum foil. The wrapper is generally inedible .
Buro/Binuro − fermented.
Daing/Dinaing/Padaing − marinated with garlic, vinegar, and black peppers. Sometimes dried and usually fried before eating.
Guinataan/sa Gata − cooked with coconut milk.
Guisa/Guisado/Ginisa or “Gisado” − sautéed with garlic, onions and/or tomatoes.
Halabos/Hinalabos – mostly for shellfish. Steamed in their own juices and sometimes carbonated soda.
Hilaw/Sariwa – unripe (for fruits and vegetables), raw (for meats). Also used for uncooked food in general (as in lumpiang sariwa).
Hinurno – baked in an oven or roasted.
Ihaw/Inihaw − grilled over coals.
Kinilaw or “Kilawin − fish or seafood marinated in vinegar or calamansi juice along with garlic, onions, ginger, tomato, peppers.
Laga/Nilaga/Palaga − boiled/braised.
Nilasing − cooked with an alcoholic beverage like wine or beer.
Lechon/Litson/Nilechon − roasted on a spit.
Lumpia – wrapped with an edible wrapper.
Minatamis − sweetened.
Pinakbet − to cook with vegetables usually with sitaw (yardlong beans), calabaza, talong (eggplant), and ampalaya (bitter melon) among others and bagoong.
Paksiw/Pinaksiw − cooked in vinegar.
Pangat/Pinangat − boiled in salted water with fruit such as tomatoes or ripe mangoes.
Palaman/Pinalaman − “filled” as in siopao, though “palaman” also refers to the filling in a sandwich.
Pinakuluan – boiled.
Prito/Pinirito − fried or deep fried. From the Spanish frito.
Relleno/Relyeno – stuffed.
Tapa/Tinapa – dried and smoked. Tapa refers to meat treated in this manner, mostly marinated and then dried and fried afterwards. Tinapa meanwhile is almost exclusively associated with smoked fish.
Sarza/Sarciado – cooked with a thick sauce.
Sinangag – garlic fried rice.
Sigang/Sinigang − boiled in a sour broth usually with a tamarind base. Other common souring agents include guava, raw mangoes, calamansi also known as calamondin.
Tosta/Tinosta/Tostado – toasted.
Torta/Tinorta/Patorta – to cook with eggs in the manner of an omelette.

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