NASA astronaut Nicole Stott examines scenes depicting space from movies and television and breaks down how accurate they really are. What actually happens when your helmet cracks in space like in Total Recall? Are the spacewalks in Gravity realistic? Could there really be AI on a space station like in 2001: A Space Odyssey?

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NASA Astronaut Breaks Down Space Scenes From Film & TV | WIRED

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47 COMMENTS

  1. 24:56 yes but she's not addressing that this was a TINY hole and i've always wondered about that scene in that movie… surely hunk of meat (we have to assume the alien is at least as tough as a human being), blocking a tiny little hole like that wouldn't get 'sucked' out because (firstly, space does NOT suck… it's getting pushed out by the pressure inside the ship!) the pressure inside wouldn't be strong enough to do that!!!?!!!! Am i right? I mean 1 atmosphere or whatever one might use in a spacecraft… wouldn't do that in that way…. i always thought it was weird…..

  2. I'm surprised that, during her review of Gravity, she didn't talk about the Kepler effect, and how difficult it would be for Clooney to actually use the jet pack the way he does so effortlessly. When he's darting around the way he does, he wouldn't be able to simply aim himself at where he intends to be, because this would change his velocity, which would change the trajectory of his orbit — "going forward" (with respect to the direction of orbit) would actually place him above (with respect to Earth) his intended target. At this point, to keep up, he'd only get farther away. It would have been cool for her to illustrate this a bit more than I can do in YT comment.

  3. I’ve been rewatching all of Star Trek over the past couple months, and it seems like every other episode something happens to cause micro fractures in the hull of the enterprise (interestingly this has yet to happen in Discovery). Wouldn’t these fractures cause catastrophic depressurization and, you know, kill everyone? This is, of course, ignoring the magic hull integrity field or whatever.

  4. That whole "passengers do far worse" statement rings so true to me even just by driving cars. I wondered if it was that the driver had their hands on the steering wheel, so more stability… but I bet its the same reason people get sea-sick… inner ear sense doesn't match expectation. The driver knows what they are doing and can overcome the subsequent forces just by dent of anticipating them.

  5. I’m so glad she said that the scene where Sandra Bullock’s character ignores NASA’s command to abort bothers her. When that movie came out, I felt like I was the only person that absolutely hated it. It felt like some idiot Hollywood writer said, “Hmm, how can I create drama? I know, lets take the best trained humans in history, have them ignore every bit of training they have ever had, panic uncontrollably, and survive pretty much by pure luck!”. Hated Gravity!!!

  6. WE ARE IN A DOME you sheep! THIS VIDEO IS FAKE. She is an actor. Astronauts are NOT REAL . WE CAN NOT LEAVE THIS ATMOSPHERE YALL. PLSE STOP BEING IGNORANT TO YOUR SURROUNDINGS

  7. Though NASA used to train astronauts in the 3 axes gyroscope, they eventually determined it would be virtually impossible to regain control in 3D space in microgravity. Blackbird pilots also trained for this, but unlike in LEO, if the blackbird started tumbling, the pilot could wait until the plane hit the stratosphere to regain control in a fall. In space with no friction, any attempt to reassert control is just as likely to add to your momentum as to reduce it.

    True story: only chuck Yeager ever managed to beat the gyroscope.

  8. The interstellar docking scene was similar to one that happened in real life with Salut – 7 when Soviet Cosmonauts had to dock into an abandoned space station to see what was going on with it. It's an amazing story that naturally gets overshadowed in the western world.

  9. The guy she mentioned was exposed to vacuum for a significant amount of time- longer than the people you see in movies that instantly die. There's also been a similar event during testing where the suit tore and a large portion of his hand was exposed and ultimately ended up fine.

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